Mar 21 2015

Desert Bouquet

Melissa Crytzer Fry

This has been such a tough winter for so many of my family and friends who don’t live in the desert southwest. A visual desert bouquet seemed like the perfect ‘gift’ to help warm everyone up as they look forward to spring (Yes, while it’s officially here, for many, spring ushered in more of the white stuff).

As my last photo blog indicated, I recently took a photography class and hope that some of what I learned shows up in the desert wildflower photos below. This time: yellow, purple and orange flowers. Next post: blues, whites and reds. (As usual, you may find it worthwhile to click on each photo to enlarge).

Of course, I have to start with a series of Mexican poppies!

Of course, I have to start with a series of Mexican poppies!

Lupine.

Desert mariposa lily.

Desert mariposa lily.

For Readers, Writers, Everyone. Did this past winter keep you down? What did you do to stay sane (and warm)? Read any books? Binge watch any shows? Write anything set in a warmer climate? Dream of a beach vacation? Stay warm, my friends. Keep reading. Keep writing. Keep living. Keep dreaming. Sunshine is on the way!


Mar 8 2015

The Stories We Tell

Melissa Crytzer Fry

My photography instructor frequently asks, “What story do you want to tell?” when she’s critiquing our photos. If the photographer has zoomed out, the visual story unfolds one way. If she zooms in – on a flower, a person, an animal, a rock, lichen – she tells quite another story, even if both exist in the same physical plane.

What story do you want to tell? The storyteller in me really likes that question. In the end, it’s all about perspective, isn’t it — in the stories we tell, in the photographs we take, in the way we view life?

Enjoy some additional shots I’ve taken over the past five weeks, using functions on my camera that I didn’t even know existed. (It’s been quite the task: weaning myself away from the ‘auto’ setting and shooting from the eyepiece versus the digital display). As usual, click on any image to enlarge (You really should; they’re WAY better when you can see the details).

For Readers, Writers, Everyone: This photography class has taught me an important lesson about mastery of a new skill: mainly that sometimes you have to get worse before you get better. Have you ever felt you had to fail a bit to succeed? (I’m not sharing the children’s portraits I took – whew wee, a portrait photographer I am NOT)